Welcome to the collision investigation home page

Introduction

In the UK Collision Investigators are treated by the Courts as Expert Witnesses and as such will have qualifications and experience in the field of collision investigation. Some may have an engineering or physics background and may have worked in research. Others such as police officers have formal qualifications in forensic collision investigation.

In partnership with De Montfort University (DMU), AiTS have developed a range of qualifications in the field of forensic road collision investigation. As an associate college of the university and part of the Faculty of Computing, Engineering and Media, AiTS provide the teaching and DMU provides the quality procedures and make the final award.

Since its inception as a University Certificate of Professional Development (UCPD) the qualification has continued to develop and it is now possible to take a UCPD, Cert HE, Foundation degree (FdSc) and full Honours degree BSc(Hons) in forensic road collision investigation.

The qualifications are constantly evolving as technology changes. The programme team meets annually with leading practitioners from the criminal and civil sides of the industry as well as lead bodies such as the Institute of Traffic Accident Investigators to ensure the programme remains fit for purpose.

Below is a brief description of the current awards.

UCPD in forensic road collision investigation

Forensic collision is based around maths and physics. There are plenty of practical aspects too. However you cannot get away from the fact that at some stage you are going to have to do a series of mathematical calculations which you incorporate into a report and present to the Court.

The UCPD provides you with the maths, physics and report writing skills to be able to do this. The course is not all academic, you are taught how to evaluate scenes, skid tests and evaluate marks, skills that you will continue to develop in your workplace. If you feel your maths may be a bit rusty make sure you sit our free maths primer course (further details by clicking on Entry Level on the menu bar).

The UCPD is a 60 credit level 4 award from De Montfort University . It is completed in one to two years of part time study depending on the route chosen. Read more about the UCPD by clicking Higher Education and UCPD on the menu bar.

CertHE in forensic road collision investigation

Forensic collision is based around maths and physics. There are plenty of practical aspects too. However you cannot get away from the fact that at some stage you are going to have to do a series of mathematical calculations which you incorporate into a report and present to the Court.

The CertHE provides you with additional tools used in the collision investigation process, and represents the next step after the UCPD.

The CertHE is a 60 credit level 4 award from De Montfort University . It is completed in one years of part time study depending on the route chosen. Read more about the CertHE by clicking Higher Education and CertHE on the menu bar.

FdSc in forensic road collision investigation

For those who complete the UCPD, the foundation degree or FdSc in forensic road collision investigation will increase your area of expertise by adding new skills to your portfolio. You will develop skills in analysing CCTV footage to establish speed, interpret accelerometer data for distance speed and vehicle behaviour and how to analyse crush damage to establish changes in speed, Motorcycle collisions and pedestrian collisions are also covered in depth. start to use new software and lea.

The FdSc takes a further two years of part time study at the rate of 60 level 4 credits in year one and 60 level 5 credits in year two and three.

The FdSc is awarded by De Montfort University. The university provides an exit award in the form of a CertHE at the end of year one.

BSc (Hons) in forensic road collision investigation

Offered as a part time course over two years, there is an opportunity to top up your FdSc to a full Honours degree. Study is all by distance learning at the rate of 60 credits per year. The second year being project based.

The FdSc is awarded by De Montfort University. For further information click on Higher Education in the menu bar.

Non academic route

You can chose to take most of the modules that make up the various qualifications as standalone modules without ever registering with the university. Further details are available on the specific module pages but a good place to start is to click on All CI Courses on the menu bar and take a look at the alphabetical list.

Confused

If you want some advice give the team a call.

 

Questions

Is the programme full or part time?

At the moment the programme can only be studied part time.

How much time will I need to spend studying?

It does vary from person to person but roughly 16 to 18 hours a week.

What happens if I don't have that amount of time?

If, for whatever reason,  you cannot commit that amount of time, this is probably not the time to start degree level studies.

When do I need to enrol?

Enrolment close on the final Friday in July for a September start.

Can I make a late enrolment?

We sometimes have a few late places but this is not guaranteed.

   

About

AiTS have been training collision investigators in the UK and overseas since 1996. We are also the UK's main provider of Roads Policing, Prohibitions and Tachograph training in the UK and Ireland.

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Contact Us

AiTS
Unit A5, Lakeside Business Park, South Cerney
GL7 5XL. UK
Tel: +44(0)1285 864650 email: mail@aitsuk.com